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: smiting goliath might as well be marshall ganz's job description. it began in mississippi's freedom summer of 1964 when his fury against injustice pulled him out of harvard and into the struggle for civil rights. from there, he signed on with the legendary cesar chavez and the united farm workers and for 16 years, struggled to unionize the men and women in the fields of california who toiled endless hours and mounting days, picking crops for next to nothing. three decades after marshall ganz had dropped out of harvard, he went back to finish his degree and earn a doctorate. a few years later, he was asked to become the architect behind the obama campaign's skillful organizing of students and volunteers. today, marshall ganz is a founder of the leading change network, a global community of organizers, educators and researchers mobilizing for democracy. you'll find more of his experience and philosophy in this book, "why david sometimes wins" marshall ganz, it's good to meet you. >> marshall ganz: it's good to meet you, bill. >> bill moyers: stories have been a powerful part of your life. wh
is recognizing our rights. that's something that's never happened in the whole history of mississippi my country. me and my partner says we are people that have dignity and respected that's a what this means (clapping) and i know that mayor newsom or governer likes the word extra ordinary but the country is sending a message because lgbt community that their rights were not ongoing by now they have to pay attention. we're now going to end with marriage equality there has to be equality for all of us including our transgender brothers and sisters. we're not leaving anyone behind this is only the beginning. thank you so much let's keep fighting. (clapping) >> his leadership has been extraordinary not only in his district it's going to be the site of a tremendous celebration this evening so have fun but really citywide and really statewide seeing as a tremendous leader supervisor scott wiener (clapping). >> thank you. thank you although the voters are annoy my - i want to thank my former boss city attorney dennis herrera. i remember back almost a decade ago from the very first moment he was there
the flooding on the other sidle of the country tonight. this is from biloxi, mississippi, the truck tearing through the water there. and from panama city, florida, tonight, this apartment complex, completely flooded out. and ginger, these totals are really something. >> this is beyond the annoyance level and now it's to almost dangerous. people are losing their property. and places like gulfport, mississippi, today, six inches in less than two hours, so, it comes down fast and, i wish i could tell you it's over, but it's not. that stationary front still sitting there for the next two days at least. however much rain does it mean? two to three inches in the red zone, from mobile into parts of the florida panhandle, right there, just north of atlanta. >> all right, ginger zee with the whole picture tonight. ginger, thank you. >>> now to the spike in bear attacks we told you about last night here. this is the time of year when they start preparing for hibernation, looking for food. and tonight here, the 12-year-old girl attacked in michigan, describing the horror for the first time. here's abc
dead. >> and moving up the gulf coast to gulfport mississippi church goers gathered in the building on the building's steps as the church became an island to the massive flooding in the mississippi streets the high waters also stranded drivers and flooding homes and businesses. one man who was responding to the rising flood watters says thinks the worse in 20 years adding even hurricane katrina back in 2005 didn't cause anything like the flooding they are seeing right now. we have been having some mild temperatures here lately mike masco but you say things are changing. >> it could be a whole lot worse. look what's going on to the west. this is pretty easy the forecast. the only issue this morning i could see happening is is a little fog. north and west of the city out in frederick hagerstown some of the visibilities coming down to five miles zero visibility 10 miles a little patchy fog and it's into the upper 50s north of the beltway close to 70 downtown and 60. s along the bay -- 60s along the bay front. we expect scattered showers this afternoon. it's not a downpour or washout bu
found himself biking to his miserable job in mississippi he felt real despair. from recognized he was 47 years old and never had a car and afford for 20 years in prison. sometimes he says it's little things like that that can drag him down into sorrow. he chose to do something that both keep those wasted years fresh in his memory. he helps to educate others in the hopes that his story will spur reform. he's not an educated man. his formal schooling stopped in 6th grade. the katrina criminal justice reform effort. that's the holistic reentry program for offenders. he told anybody with time to spare and inclination to listen. putting a face on an abstract idea, injustice. on this particular afternoon in may 2012, he tells this story to me for a fourth time. he is deeply preoccupied with a judge who denied his case for years. who also heard his murder case in 1976. the month he was released the judge died. greg goes to his house to get his tattered obituary he's read many times. the obituary says nice things. the judge may have been a goodman, greg muses, he might have been a good husband,
old housing stock. we have the oldest housing stock this side of mississippi. and that's where our problems are most likely to be. >> i going to test the microphone and ask people how you expect your home to perform. >> anybody who wants to share. tell us, what kind of building. do you live in a wood frame >> yes >> after a major earthquake. what's your expectation. >> i am afraid from last year's earthquake class, you mentioned. the house might pop to the street because my garage is empty. >> is it in the middle of the block? >> middle. >> there's less chance. sir, what kind of building do you live in? >> i live in an apartment if ground floor parking. >> in the middle of the block, corner. >> corner. >> are there openings on both sides? >> yes. on both sides. >> it's a wood framed building? >> it seems to be a hybrid. with concrete and steel and wood frame on top of that. >> we don't often see that. modern buildings have a podium. >> what neighborhood are you in >> dolores park. >> you will hit the lake. if are in the dolores, you are in pretty good shape. >> what is your expecta
to mississippi or texas or whether we have escaped from. this is the only place on earth that we have so we have a special bloogs to maintain a sanctuary for lgbt people. i think this is the moment where the city is recognizing there's a problem and not all gay people are rich and thank you for your support >> thank you. >> good afternoon, commissioners. i'm at lyric. i feel it's important for the commissioners to approve this as a former queer trans youth it's difficult four us i mean the queer and queer variant. when i was in the homeless shelter it was difficult i faced many prejudices. even when shelter say they address accident queer or the transgenders i know they don't. i notice a lot of any sisters from the age of 16 to 24 their subject to a lot of abuse and be it physical or verbal they suffer abuse in general. it's hard to exist in a closed-minded society. you're not seen as the person you are but whatever someone else knows you represent. so many of my sisters are forced out into the street to do prostitution or anyway to make a living. i feel as though we're losing some of the brig
potion to every flesh on the art that inudes people timothy mississippi when i was in my early 20s i found a beef in the wo but rected it even though i ut believewhat i'dearned are repeed &ater to become unwaveri belief in my own pardoble ekenf i am i will stl support m%nistry of the lord pray for forgiveness i also ll and the succs thank you r your prayers a you a i our prayers as well timothy i th is hebrews 6 versus 45 nutes and six camden knowledge is what y said you did you believe yougot off the ways of the world is notuncommon for somebody in their late teens or early 20s i think in yougg man that'salle rmes omaladjustment or whateverway he came to your sses becamecctable word what u need to do no good yourfather for i know le you have letter asked for forgens received it on or with your feobin texas verymportant to understa are wen the first or second di'á kw for su things we will we did go to heavenf this is the second earth age and i was bad in the fst bo good now on the second then what happs must be confused or misunberstand plea explain or bkys me on the best dvd to wat
be in mississippi or anywhere else. -- trent would like people to think he would rather be in mississippi or anywhere else. he's in a position to do very well here. in that clip we showed jim van i -- >> the executive director of "politico." >> you quote him. he is contemptuous of washington's it used to be better reflects. -- reflex. what is he saying there? are we old-timers worthless? jim is putting forth the view that the age at which the 20 boys on the bus are setting the agenda in their one story they write or file a day are over. of the missions of "politico" is to democratize the conversation. 100,000 people can read mike allen every day. everyone can blog about it. what jim was saying is that there is this wild west. there is this notion that the conversation has been broken open. disparaging, as especially of the body types of my forbearers in the journalism world. he was probably just trying to draw a sharp contest -- contrast. >> is there such a group, middle-age, left of center, overweight men who decided how the way all of us see politics and governance. you can. -- >> -- ca
battered much of the southeast is again present flash floods and record rainfall. gulfport, mississippi got hit the worst receiving roughly 6 in. of rain. the rising rotor's covered roads, stalled cars and stranded drivers. the airport reportedly received more than 4.5 in. of rain in one hour. the heaviest rain has moved out and more showers are in the forecast. well for that reason for central idaho is now blocking more than 100,000 a.. lightning ignited the beaver creek fire almost two weeks ago. weather has helped firefighters but by last night it was only 5 percent contained. 2200 homes had been evacuated >> prison authorities examining information relating to the death of princess diana and her boyfriend. scotland yard is not saying what the information is, only that officers are assessing the relevance and credibility. the telegraph reports detectives were looking into claims princess diana was murdered by a member of the british military. the couple was killed and a high-speed crash in paris 16 years ago well, what he was chasing them. prince william set down for his first off
fell in areas. gulfport, mississippi, was swamped. flooding forced the first day of school in washington county, florida, to be canceled. san diego mayor bob fillner is expected back at city hall to. he has been out of sight since announcing in july that he would seek therapy cunce announcing in july him of sexual harassment. as carter evans reports, fillner now faces a fight to keep his job. >> hey hey, ho, ho. he has got to go. >> the drive to recall san sand-- san diego mayor bob filner is officially under way. >> our petitions for recall are here. >> on the eve of his return to the city hall. >> what is it going to be like in the workplace when the mayor is back in the hallways? >> it's going to be awkward, and there's going to be some tension. >> reporter: city attorney jan goldsmith says the mayor cannot undo the damage he's already done. and he gave this warning to filner when he does return, behave or else. >> we're to the going to just sit back and let him have the run of city hall without having some protections for our employees. that's our obligation. >> reporte
mississippi, dejaron carreteas anegadas, y conductores varados, hubo demoras y suspenciÓn de vuelos, pronostican mÁs lluvias para el resto de la semana. en idaho el problema no es agua, sino fuego, de un incendio forestal que amenaza cientos de casa en el estado, se desplegÓ a cientos de bomberos para asistir a la poblaciÓn, levantando barricadas, y alejÁndolos, 1200 bomberos y aviones cisternas convocan la
south through mississippi, alabama, georgia up into the carolinas. all of this has stayed south of us. to the north and west, clearer skies out here. we think and we are pretty sure overnight tonight, all of these clouds continue to track to the west. our skies clear overnight tonight. once the clouds clear overnight, there is going to be the chance for a little bit of fog forming out there. it doesn't look like it is that bad area wide. where we get fog forming it could be quite dense. keep that in mind for the first couple of hours. 66 overnight, winds out of the south 5-10. temperatures upper 80s, accuweather forecast, foggy spots in the morning, warm at noon. 88° is hot. we haven't had 88° in a while. 90 wednesday. that is going to stay with us through friday. the weekend looking pretty good. back to middle 80s. less humid and dry. >> welcome back august. >> let's head to brian who is standing by. >> critical new phase into investigation of governor bob mcdonnell. a young man charged with armed robbery tries to make a run for it in a maryland courthouse. never guess where poli
mississippi on sunday turning roads into rivers. flooding has not been this bad since hurricane katrina in 2005. >>> in england, outrage grows after the partner of newspaper reporter glenn greenwald is detained under a uk terrorism act. david miranda was released after nine hours of questioning. this is according to "guardian" newspaper. no charges were filed but cell phone and other items were confiscated. greenwald works for the guardian newspaper and broke the story of the secret surveillance programs in the united states. >>> in other news, a new week of trading on wall street and stocks are expected to open flat. investors take a breath following two weeks of losses. ringing the opening bell this morning, representatives from american corporate profits. there they are, just about to ring the bell. >>> one-on-one with the future king. prince william sat down with max foster opening up about parenthood for the first time since the birth of his son, george. of course, the prince talked about that moment he walked out of the hospital with his wife and his son to that incredible media f
rescues along the beach. the choppy surf driven by the winds. >>> southern mississippi is drying up after almost six inches of rain fell in two hours. cars stuck and fire crews having to come out to help all the people. officials there handed out stand bags to protect the homes at risk of being inundated with the water. >>> can you imagine this? people went to church. by the time they left, the parking lot was full. some of they had waded out to their cars. the water did eventually go down and they were able to head home. >> good gracious, this is incredible. not that we are blaming you, but we are looking for explanations. >> this is incredible. at this point, month after month. we started this trend of drenching the southeast in june. july, setting records. it is august and we are still talking about an incredible amount of tropical moisture. the influx into the south. you can see, this is the area we are watching. each day, that moisture got closer. combined with a stationary front, they brought together unbelievable amounts of rainfall. i want to show you how far over the average, alo
some time with senator eastland from mississippi and ted kennedy said dick russell. the fact is, you were within your own party caucus how to deal with people with whom you fundamentally disagree and that -in turn was great preparation -for the larger senate and indeed the larger body politics. that's gone. we now have a rigidly conservative and rigidly liberal party. >> what about you look a lot at -political engent and civic action right. how has that changed and how -does that fit into the kind strife that we're talking about here in washington. table, as they would say in the senate my friends here, my distinguished friends and colleagues. that if we want to make sense of what's happening now the moment to look back to when a lot of these things against change is the 60's and 70's, and this was a moment when many people on the right and on the left looked at what they would have described as the washington establishment and said this isn't responsive enough to the people. and they thought there were a number of ways
is alive this morning. we say hey y'all. fine folks from mississippi. >> tupelo, mississippi. >> home of elvis presley. thanks for being here this morning. let's show what you can expect today. wilmington, north carolina, hello to everyone watching us this morning, wect. watch for scattered thunderstorms today and temperature right around 85 degrees. it is the same old story for us in the southeast. more showers and storms, including the carolinas, up to the virginias. the rest of the country, primarily dry. hot, especially in the west. exacerbating the fire issues out there. forecast, stalled front across the southeast, more showers and storms. looking beautiful >>> hey, thanks, mike. good morning to you. 8:07. back to work monday. this is san francisco where you can see that compressed marine layer. let's show you what it looks like now on the golden gate bridge where you can hardly see anything at all. please travel cautiously. 72 degrees in the city headed your way. elsewhere, we do have a chance for thunderstorms and we have a red flag warning in place for today, tomorrow, all th
's day that bridge collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. 13 people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than 13 months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the
mother black. they had to leave mississippi in the '60s to get married. >> how did it affect you, the idea that your parents' marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> that's the moment where i really tried in the language of poetry to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. white marble on confederate avenue. i stand on ground once hallowed by a web of -- >> one of the themes of her work is memory. what gets left out of the nation's public record. she won a pulitzer prize in 2007 for native guard. about a forgotten black union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know it is our duty now to keep white men as prisoners. rebel soldiers. would-be masters. >> she wrote that poem in the library's reading room in seat 170. sometimes to rest her eyes, she would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> now when i do it, i can't see the word poetry so clearly. but i have faith that it's there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead. for a
well is somewhere in mississippi. >> in that clip, we show mike allen and jim vaned high whose job is -- >> the executive director of politico. >> you quote him in here. this quote came to you from him? >> i'll read it. >> jim vaned high is contemptuous of washington -- it used to be better reflex of how he relates to news. he said it was largely, and this is true for decades, a small group of middle age left of center overweight men who decided how all of us should see politics and govern us. what is he saying there? so we old timers are worthless. >> he's setting the view that those 20 boys on the bus setting the agenda in the one story they file in a day are over. its's to demock rattize the discussion. anyone can tweet or blog about it. i think what jim was saying there is that there is this wild west. there is this notion that the conversation is broken open. i wouldn't be disparaging of the body types of my forebearers. but he -- so i think that he was probably just trying to draw a sharp contrast. >> was there such a group around here? a small group of middle aged -- i don't
rate. in fact, only five states have a higher one. nevada, illinois, mississippi, rhode island and north carolina. pretty stunning. by the way, christie has kept a football field's worth of distance between himself and controversial gop senate nominee. but finally decide to endorse him at an event on tuesday. the first and last time chris christie probably campaigning with him. washington chief correspondent dan balls. and political eder to for the degreo.com harry bacon jr. and liz showny from the associated press. mr. balls, we have dined out on candidates starting presidential campaigns early for decades. in some ways, we love it as political junkies. what's surprising is when front-runners who don't need to do it dip in too early. hillary clinton, dipping too fast? >> i'm not sure. i think you're right. part of this is driven by us. >> doesn't take much to feed -- >> our april tied petite to get next campaign grows so that's part of it. the other is could she avoid it anyway? she's being drawn into the conversation in a sense whether she contributes to it or not. the fact t
? where is this trend going? >> we found there's a wide variation in welfare benefits inch mississippi, only 16-$17,000 a year in welfare benefits in a state like hawai'i it was almost $50,000. so that is a pretty good wage if you want to take it that way. >> neil: you know, worries me there's going to be a lot of people listening and watching saying, all the more reason that you double the minimum wage, all the more reason you bring it up to $15 an hour. i would flip it around and say all the more reason you scale back the benefits so they're so general didn't -- generous. >> raiding wages you just increase unemployment. you can't force companies to pay people more than the productivity that's provide. as soon as you start doing that, the companies basically just reduce the amount of labor they have going in. they reduce wages. you're already seeing that, of course, if obamacare. >> neil: welfare was supposed to be temporary in the beginning, supposed to be at a level that wouldn't even have you consider such a move. but between welfare and these other programs that augment and ad --
was assassinated in his own driveway in mississippi. we were a very different country. the original march on washington for jobs and freedom which took place august 28, 1963 was a call to action, not just to citizens of all colors who were concerned about civil rights but to politicians. in fact, the original march was mainly directed at little leaders in congress and in the white house to follow through on president kennedy's push for a civil rights bill which passed the following year. 50 years later, the supreme court's conservative majority including its lone black member have gutted the voting rights act passed two years after the march in 1965. states are rolling back access to health care for women and the working class. it's under constant attack. we are a different country but still have a fight 0 our hands. so when you watch the coverage commemorating the march remember the call to action is political because it always has been. thanks so much for watching. "hardball" with chris matthews is next. >>> hillary's ahead of schedule but who is driving the bus? let's play "hardball."
of mississippi. meredith integrated ole miss back in 1962, becoming the first black student to enroll at the all-white university in the heart of the deep south. segregation is rioted on his first day in campus, forcing president kennedy to send in the national guard to restore order. but james meredith would go on to graduate and continue to advocate for civil rights. his courage is an example to all of us. we're celebrating that kind of courage this friday in a special edition of "politics nation" covering the march on washington 50 years later. joining me, martin luther king iii and congressman john lewis as we look back on dr. king's dream and look ahead to the work yet to be done. it's all on the night before the march on washington that i'll lead with martin luther king iii. we hope you'll tune into that show and join us for the march. yeah? then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. silence. are you in good hands? apply cold therapy in the first 24 hours. but not just any cold. i only use new ther
already hard hit areas. gulfport, mississippi, slammed with more than a foot of rain leaving a church parking lot flooded out following sunday services. >>> olympic sprinter oscar pistorius charged with preita premeditated death. he was indicted on what would have been reeva steenkamp's 30th birthday. his trial scheduled to begin next year. >>> hosni mubarak has been acquitted in one case against him and remains in custody facing his most serious charge related to the deadly crackdown this spring. putting the u.s. and europe in the difficult position of reevaluating aid. >>> army private bradley manning could learn today just how much time he will spend in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to wikileaks. faces a maximum sentence of 90 years and manning apologized for his actions and for hurting the united states. a military judge could announce her decision as early as today. >>> critics of bob filner hitting the streets of san diego to collect 101 signatures. trying to recall their embattled mayor. 16 women now accuse filner of sexual harassment. later t
will show you pictures, this is gulfport, mississippi. six inches of rain fell alone there yesterday. you can see flooding the streets, stranding so many drivers. flood watches and warnings are in place all the way from the florida panhandle northward to the carolinas. people trying to leave a church in gulfport either had to wade through the waist-deep water or wait for it to recede. south florida, rip currents very, very dangerous. police report 50 rescues. in fact, an elderly couple drowned. >>> families are being told to get out as this incredibly dangerous wildfire scorches the community of sun valley, idaho. the fire has grown to more than 100,000 acres. much of this part of the country home to a lot of pricey property. you have actor tom hanks, bruce willis, they have places there. then the fire crews, 1200 firefighters working tirelessly to gain ground on the flames, trying to save the thousands of homes still in this fire's path. academy award winning actor richard dreyfuss is among those expressing gratitude to the fire crews. this was his tweet. the beaver creek fire is ravagin
collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the senate passed a bipartisan
of biloxi but trust me, from mississippi, alabama, georgia, even into the carolinas, there are many neighborhoods that are beginning to look like this. atlanta's had its yearly rainfall total and we still have four months to go in the year. really wet season and more rain coming. in the purple-shaded area, which is much of the southeast, 1 to 2 inches of additional rain from all this gulf moisture right in that charleston, columbia, raleigh area. raleigh, tough for you too. 2 to 3 inches of rain of the tough, tough story and continues today. >>> good monday morning. i'm abc7 news meteorologist mike nicco. unusual weather pattern fronts, thunderstorms and high fire danger through wednesday. today temperatures a little above average and with the humidity it will feel a little stuffy, especially in the east bay where we'll hit the 90s. you can see the 70s throughout the bay shore. tonight we'll cool back into the 60s. it will be kind of stuffy when you step outside tomorrow. once >> all that weather was brought to you by angie's list. when we come back we'll talk about the warm-up. i k
to parts of the gulf coast this weekend. gulf port mississippi is swamped. and flooding caused schools to be canceled today in three florida counties. more rain is in the forecast. >> >>> good morning. got a few clouds around the bay area this morning. so far it is quiet. this afternoon could get interesting. possibility of isolated thunderstorms around the bay area. looking back towards san francisco a little hazy and dense fog. low pressure spinning off the coastline. it is going to sit there the next few days and keep things unsettled through wednesday. red flag warnings up in the mountain tops. up into the 90s. >>> that national report sponsored by the new thriller in theaters august 28th. >>> new questions this morning about the death of princess diana. >> reporter: good morning, charlie, gayle. there have been conspiracy theories about the death of princess diana and dodi fayed in that paris car crash since it happened. police here in scotland yard are admitting they are actually looking into the latest allegation that the death was caused by, wait for it a member of
the weekend. we've got some pictures this morning out of biloxi but trust me from mississippi, alabama, georgia, even into the carolinas there are many neighborhoods that are going to be looking like this. atlanta's had its yearly rainfall total and four months to go in the year. really wet season and more rain coming. area much of the southeast, 1 to 2 inches of additional rain from all this gulf moisture right in that charleston, columbia, raleigh area. raleigh, tough for you too. 2 to 3 inches of rain of the tough, tough story and continues today. 2 to 3 inches of rain of the >> all that weather was brought to you by angie's list. with we come back we'll talk about the warm-up. summer has been missing in parts of northeast. it's about to make a return. >>> prince william speaks out for the first time since the birth of baby george about princess kate and being a dad. >>> we also have the littest on the stunning headlines about the new investigation into princess diana's death. >>> then the shocking response from the popular sports announcer after his son was arrested in the death of
the storm troopers of the movement. they went into the mississippi delta, where other organizations were afraid to go. and out of the mississippi delta, a sharecropping family. by her own account, went to school only one date in her entire life. i would argue she was one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. the speech that she gave the democratic national convention in 1964, you can youtube it. if you have not heard it, hear it. it is one of the most eloquent statements i've heard. a courageous woman. but again, if we move from the national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of the most exciting things about being involved in the scholarly production of the civil rights movement, we have a lot of really good stuff that is coming up that is talking about these local activists who are anonymous for the most part with a national movement. and if we go back to where we are today clearly, we are at a place where we have to think of very local terms the action is going to be at the state level. living in kansas, i would argue kansas is a laborat
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)